COVID-19 Restrictions – 2/1/2021

In line with the latest restrictions from the NI Executive, and following advice gratefully received from Rowing Ireland Ulster Branch and SportNI, the club will remain closed for all activity until at least 6th February 2021.
The current legislation includes an Executive review three weeks into this period, so there is a possibility the restrictions could be extended beyond the 6th February, so further details will be published and distributed as an when we get them.
Indoor and outdoor training continues to be permitted for “Elite Athletes” as well as outdoor training for schools as part of their Physical Education program but all other facilities, such as ours, must close completely during this time.

“In response to the significant challenges facing the health service due to the Covid-19 pandemic the Executive have announced a package of interventions and restrictions for the coming weeks.

The aim of these restrictions is to drive the R number down and in doing so protect the Health Service through a challenging period that lies immediately ahead. All sectors are being asked to play their part in this collaborative effort.

Much of sport will be affected but the Executive continues to recognise the physical and mental health benefits associated with individuals exercising outdoors on an individual basis or with members of their household. All sports Governing bodies and their clubs are asked to demonstrate leadership within the community by complying with these restrictions. By doing so sport can make a valuable contribution to driving the R number down which will in turn lead to higher levels of sport activity being permitted once this period of restrictions is eased.”

Summary Position for sport and physical activity following recent executive announcements – SportNI

COVID-19 Restrictions – 29/10/2020

In line with the latest advice issued by SportNI and Rowing Ireland Ulster Branch today, the club will cease all crew boat activities until further notice.

Single sculls and crew boats within households are still permitted, as is indoor training on an individual basis only. Only one person (plus a coach, where appropriate) will be allowed in the hall at any given time.

Access to boating slots and indoor training time will continue in the usual way, speak to your Crew Coordinators if you have any questions.

The committee thanks all members for adhering to the rules, we know these new restrictions will be unpopular but all parts of society must play its part in reducing the R number, and that includes sport.

Covid-19 Restrictions – Indoor Training

I’m happy to report that the latest advice has been posted by Rowing Ireland we are now permitted to resume indoor training. 

We are required to limit numbers due to the size of our hall so no more than two people will be permitted at any given time (though more are permitted if they are all from the same household). Social distancing must be applied at all times, and no hard surfaces are to be shared between individuals (so no ‘working in’ with weights equipment etc) and all surfaces must be thoroughly cleaned before and after use so that each person is responsible for their own safety. 

Cleaning supplies can be found on the table in the hall, with more in the cleaning store. If these supplies begin running low, email me at captain@belfastrowing.com.

Showers and changing rooms remain closed, but use of the bathrooms is permitted.

Use of the hall can be reserved in one-hour slots using the new sheet on the existing sign-in form (I wont share the link here, but if you need access check your previous emails or contact me) you have been using so far. You’ll see the tabs for navigating between the sheets in the bottom-left of the window.

Rowing Ireland’s Women In Coaching Spotlight – Gillian McCaughtry

Our very own Gillian McCaughtry spoke to Rowing Ireland about her experiences as a woman in coaching and her history in the sport, as well as sharing her advice for anyone thinking about getting involved in coaching.

You can read the full interview on the Rowing Ireland website!
https://www.rowingireland.ie/women-in-coaching-spotlight-gillian-mccaughtry/

Test Article

This is a test of the post system, to check it updates in the correct places on the new website.

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Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

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You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

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Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.